A Book of Mormons shows the Mormon collective talent for first-person experience narratives and personal essays is alive and flourishing.  A kind of literary step up from the ‘I’m a Mormon videos,’ this volume features diversity of a less visible sort as a range of thinkers describe–achingly, beautifully, and comically by turns–their dreams, labors, pains, and joys in building Zion.”  – John Durham Peters

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So to hear Sister Mkhabela’s prayer and to see her stand before us was not just an act of faith; it challenged the theology that drove various prophets, apostles and other Church leaders to declare that people of black African descent were under a curse. In many ways, it reaffirmed for me that faith and prayer can be an act of liberation; from the spiritual bondage that was placed on black people by denying us access to the highest level of the Celestial Kingdom to the physical barriers that kept us from appearing before our brothers and sisters. That is what makes the moment so memorable for me and perhaps so many black Saints. See more at http://rationalfaiths.com/we-are-here/

Janan Graham

“A Book of Mormons shows the Mormon collective talent for first-person experience narratives and personal essays is alive and flourishing. A kind of literary step up from the ‘I’m a Mormon videos,’ this volume features diversity of a less visible sort as a range of thinkers describe–achingly, beautifully, and comically by turns–their dreams, labors, pains, and joys in building Zion.”

John Durham Peters